Two fingers from a society of babyfathers and child mothers – Sunday Independent 14th August 2011

Read Article HERE!

Ruth Dudley Edwards: Two fingers from a society of babyfathers and child mothers

The liberal elite is being forced to face the fact that there is a lot more to clear up than the streets, writes Ruth Dudley Edwards

Sunday Independent

Sunday August 14 2011

I love London — its architecture, its history, its parks, its energy and its cosmopolitanism. Too big to be a coherent whole, it’s made up of villages. People cleave to the bits they know: I’ve known Londoners who have never ventured more than a couple of miles from home.

Although until recently I’ve mostly lived on the outskirts, I’ve always either worked or had friends in central London. These days I live in Covent Garden and love its liveliness.

When last weekend the violence started, human nature dictated that — while any attacks on our city trouble us (remember the 52 victims of 7/7?) — Londoners were most concerned about the neighbourhoods and people they knew.

On Monday evening, I was with three friends. One, a Spurs supporter, was talking about what had happened in Tottenham on Saturday, where it all started. Another, who lived in Walthamstow, described staying up until 3am watching rioters: for fear of arson he didn’t go to bed until the police car beneath his window had burned out and all was quiet. As the third — a neighbour from my previous village — was leaving, I said to her breezily, “Well, at least Ealing is safe.” For Ealing is so leafy and refined that it’s known as the Queen of the Suburbs.

Then I sat down to watch the 24-hour news and saw Ealing — where I’d lived for 30 years — in flames, as was Croydon, where I’d lived for the second half of the Seventies. I found terribly affecting the interview with the owner of my favourite Ealing wine bar –peaceful because it’s so uncool — who was describing her sheer terror as she saw burning shops and heard people kicking in her windows and looting bottles. She had not been so frightened since 2001, when an IRA bomb went off a few yards away.

However, Londoners — like residents of the other affected cities — have to avoid becoming bores about their own experiences. What matters is the picture overall and what lessons we learn. Here are some of the contributory factors, which have been known to the man and woman in the street for a long time, but which only now are the liberal elite being forced to confront.

The children most at risk in society today are those with no family structure: at the bottom of the heap in terms of aspiration or achievement are Afro-Caribbean and white boys with no father. The pendulum has swung from stigmatising and punishing single mothers to a situation where a pregnant child can expect non-judgemental support from social services, adequate money and a council flat in which to bring up her fatherless child.

The babyfather, sauntering by en route to impregnate another mug without taking any responsibility for the result, will be admired by his peers. The other week, a tabloid featured a delighted 29-year-old grandfather.

Adults have ceded authority to children: parents are afraid to discipline their young; teachers are fearful of unjust accusations and have no sanctions except exclusion; child-centred education has produced all too many knowledge-free illiterates and innumerates; the police have been so brainwashed by political correctness they arrest householders who resist burglars; and the courts are reluctant to send the young to prison lest they become hardened criminals. So children view adults with contempt and delight in sticking two fingers up at them. “We’re showing them we can do what we want,” a girl told the BBC.

Primary schools have been dangerously feminised: a quarter of English primary schools have no male teachers, not least because the hysteria about paedophilia has frightened men off. Similarly, fewer and fewer men are prepared to get involved in organisations like the Scouts, which anyway these days is mixed-gender, and risk-averse because of health-and-safety considerations. So for many boys who want adventure, their role models are gangsters, drugs dealers and vicious, misogynistic rappers.

It is because children need boundaries and authority figures that many of them end up in gangs, where they feel part of a family and understand the rules. Indeed, for a scared kid in a rough estate, joining a gang may be necessary for survival. Police, charged with tackling a knife culture that has seen more than 20 Londoners dead in the last few years, leave the big guys alone but can be heavy-handed with the weak. Plenty of the recent looting was directed by gang leaders: children were stealing boxes of mobile phones to order.

It wasn’t the young who invented greed, consumerism or the celebrity culture, but in the absence of decent values, it’s all many of them have. England used to have too much deference towards authority: these days, there is little respect for any of the institutions that hold a society together.

The media have been assiduous in exposing the sins of politicians, police and the military and the church is regarded as a joke. And now the hacking scandal implicates journalists and further damages politicians and police. The kids look at TV, say “they’re all at it”, and use that as a justification.

Excessive immigration has been foisted on England by patrician politicians, EU laws and the human rights industry. Yet it is immigrants who revere traditional virtues who have provided many of the heroes last week.

In Birmingham, Tariq Jahan, holding a photograph of his murdered son Haroon, took a moral lead against revenge that moved us all. The Asians who stood by their gutted shops and spoke of the British neighbours who supported them gave hope. And the Archbishop of York, an East African Asian, after a robust defence of law-and-order, spoke for the vast mass of the British people when he said uncompromisingly: “Sadly, we have created an individualistic, disposable society, with weakened family and community structures, where the interests of me, myself and I have become paramount. In many ways, we have made a god of self and self-interest.”

There is a lot more to clear up than the streets.

Two fingers from a society of babyfathers and child mothers – Sunday Independent 14th August 2011

Read Article HERE!

Ruth Dudley Edwards: Two fingers from a society of babyfathers and child mothers

The liberal elite is being forced to face the fact that there is a lot more to clear up than the streets, writes Ruth Dudley Edwards

Sunday Independent

Sunday August 14 2011

I love London — its architecture, its history, its parks, its energy and its cosmopolitanism. Too big to be a coherent whole, it’s made up of villages. People cleave to the bits they know: I’ve known Londoners who have never ventured more than a couple of miles from home.

Although until recently I’ve mostly lived on the outskirts, I’ve always either worked or had friends in central London. These days I live in Covent Garden and love its liveliness.

When last weekend the violence started, human nature dictated that — while any attacks on our city trouble us (remember the 52 victims of 7/7?) — Londoners were most concerned about the neighbourhoods and people they knew.

On Monday evening, I was with three friends. One, a Spurs supporter, was talking about what had happened in Tottenham on Saturday, where it all started. Another, who lived in Walthamstow, described staying up until 3am watching rioters: for fear of arson he didn’t go to bed until the police car beneath his window had burned out and all was quiet. As the third — a neighbour from my previous village — was leaving, I said to her breezily, “Well, at least Ealing is safe.” For Ealing is so leafy and refined that it’s known as the Queen of the Suburbs.

Then I sat down to watch the 24-hour news and saw Ealing — where I’d lived for 30 years — in flames, as was Croydon, where I’d lived for the second half of the Seventies. I found terribly affecting the interview with the owner of my favourite Ealing wine bar –peaceful because it’s so uncool — who was describing her sheer terror as she saw burning shops and heard people kicking in her windows and looting bottles. She had not been so frightened since 2001, when an IRA bomb went off a few yards away.

However, Londoners — like residents of the other affected cities — have to avoid becoming bores about their own experiences. What matters is the picture overall and what lessons we learn. Here are some of the contributory factors, which have been known to the man and woman in the street for a long time, but which only now are the liberal elite being forced to confront.

The children most at risk in society today are those with no family structure: at the bottom of the heap in terms of aspiration or achievement are Afro-Caribbean and white boys with no father. The pendulum has swung from stigmatising and punishing single mothers to a situation where a pregnant child can expect non-judgemental support from social services, adequate money and a council flat in which to bring up her fatherless child.

The babyfather, sauntering by en route to impregnate another mug without taking any responsibility for the result, will be admired by his peers. The other week, a tabloid featured a delighted 29-year-old grandfather.

Adults have ceded authority to children: parents are afraid to discipline their young; teachers are fearful of unjust accusations and have no sanctions except exclusion; child-centred education has produced all too many knowledge-free illiterates and innumerates; the police have been so brainwashed by political correctness they arrest householders who resist burglars; and the courts are reluctant to send the young to prison lest they become hardened criminals. So children view adults with contempt and delight in sticking two fingers up at them. “We’re showing them we can do what we want,” a girl told the BBC.

Primary schools have been dangerously feminised: a quarter of English primary schools have no male teachers, not least because the hysteria about paedophilia has frightened men off. Similarly, fewer and fewer men are prepared to get involved in organisations like the Scouts, which anyway these days is mixed-gender, and risk-averse because of health-and-safety considerations. So for many boys who want adventure, their role models are gangsters, drugs dealers and vicious, misogynistic rappers.

It is because children need boundaries and authority figures that many of them end up in gangs, where they feel part of a family and understand the rules. Indeed, for a scared kid in a rough estate, joining a gang may be necessary for survival. Police, charged with tackling a knife culture that has seen more than 20 Londoners dead in the last few years, leave the big guys alone but can be heavy-handed with the weak. Plenty of the recent looting was directed by gang leaders: children were stealing boxes of mobile phones to order.

It wasn’t the young who invented greed, consumerism or the celebrity culture, but in the absence of decent values, it’s all many of them have. England used to have too much deference towards authority: these days, there is little respect for any of the institutions that hold a society together.

The media have been assiduous in exposing the sins of politicians, police and the military and the church is regarded as a joke. And now the hacking scandal implicates journalists and further damages politicians and police. The kids look at TV, say “they’re all at it”, and use that as a justification.

Excessive immigration has been foisted on England by patrician politicians, EU laws and the human rights industry. Yet it is immigrants who revere traditional virtues who have provided many of the heroes last week.

In Birmingham, Tariq Jahan, holding a photograph of his murdered son Haroon, took a moral lead against revenge that moved us all. The Asians who stood by their gutted shops and spoke of the British neighbours who supported them gave hope. And the Archbishop of York, an East African Asian, after a robust defence of law-and-order, spoke for the vast mass of the British people when he said uncompromisingly: “Sadly, we have created an individualistic, disposable society, with weakened family and community structures, where the interests of me, myself and I have become paramount. In many ways, we have made a god of self and self-interest.”

There is a lot more to clear up than the streets.

Father awarded €32,000 at court of human rights – Irish Times 28 July 2011

AN IRISH father has been awarded €32,000 against Hungary by the European Court of Human Rights for its failure to enforce the return of his child from Hungary to France, where they lived, following the parents’ divorce.

Read full story HERE.

Recent Media discussion of fatherlessness aspect of UK Street Riots 11th August 2011

Kevin Myers: Feral rioters all have one thing in common — a lack of father figures

 

By Kevin Myers

Wednesday August 10 2011  Iriish Independent

The duty of journalists is to tell the truth. If we don’t do that, it’s the equivalent of a nurse comfortably chatting over a nice cup of tea while an empty saline drip feeds air into a patient’s artery. The moment that we think it’s more important to protect some comfortable ideological dogma is the moment when our particular patient, truth, begins to die. I take no pleasure in what follows; but there is a job to be done, so here goes.

Perhaps the most astounding element in the British television coverage of the riots over much of England has been the steadfast refusal to mention the race of most of the rioters. They are clearly, and overwhelmingly, Afro-Caribbean, the descendants of immigrants, though such has been the utter British failure to integrate so much of the immigrant population that many have retained something of a Caribbean accent. Admittedly, not all of the rioters are “black”: clearly, some white youths have joined in.

But where they have not got race is common, they probably have another feature that joins them: absent father-figures. An astonishing number of young males in London are the sons of single mothers. They have been raised without the presence of a male authority figure to impose familial order, and furthermore and most vitally, to promote the patriarchy.

Contrary to what the feminist mantra of recent decades has proposed, the patriarchy was not invented to oppress woman, but devised by Abraham to control men. Adolescent males, without an imposed order, are as feral as chimpanzees. This is why all societies have adopted rigorous means of imposing authority on teenage boys, and which always requires male authority-figures: either sergeant-majors or patriarchs or that unfashionable thing, “dads”.

But Britain, like Ireland, went down the insane path of encouraging single mothers to have children: indeed, both societies actually created additional incentives for unmarried women to reproduce. It is social lunacy, delinquency turned into state policy, to encourage women to bear a population of young males without fathers. Yet that is what our two islands have been doing in a weak-minded, abject capitulation to the feminist ideological dogma that men are really redundant in the family. Yet the statistics across the world show that the single mother is far more likely to raise a criminal, a thug or rapist, than the married mother. No fewer than 70pc of young offenders in Britain are from single-parent families. It is not mere “poverty” that produces the socially dysfunctional male, so much as father-free families.

Moreover, in all societies in the world where Afro-Caribbeans have settled, there is a problem with male teenage gang culture. That being the case — for whatever reason — it makes no sense whatever to “reward” single mothers of that background for having boys without a father-figure to control them. The facta are known: black children of single mothers are twice as likely to commit crime as black children with two parents. Nearly 60pc of London’s Afro-Caribbean mothers are single. If the allure of the male hierarchy in a gang on the street proves irresistible, then ahead awaits social disaster.

There is a third element. Immigration: not of the parents or grandparents of the young males currently dismantling London and other cities, but more recent immigration, much of it white, that prevents young natives, of any ethnic background, getting jobs. There are some 10,000 unemployed in Tottenham — though the moronic oxymoron term “jobseeker” is now the fashionable term to describe the unemployed. No doubt many want jobs — for every job vacancy in Tottenham there are 54 applications — but it is surely gilding the lily to describe every single dole-taker (whether he is in Britain or here) as someone really seeking employment. But that aside, in the past 10 years under the egregious and depraved policies of Tony Blair and Gordon Brown, an already overcrowded Britain took in over two million immigrants. Where have the jobs gone? That’s where.

Six years ago, I wrote a column for ‘The Irish Times’ about the riots then erupting across immigrant areas in France and Britain. Michael D Higgins TD issued a statement in which he said: “The contents of his column today go beyond his usually crafted cowardice, staying one step on the safe side of prosecution for incitement to hatred or racism.”

“Usually crafted cowardice”, eh? Is cowardice really a characteristic of my journalism? And that’s before we even come to the delightful implication of racist intent. So, is it remotely surprising that we never had any proper discussion about immigration, if a future presidential candidate of this Republic could feel free to use such vile and actionable language about a critic of our immigration non-policies?

Immigration did not cause our collapse, but the refusal to create an immigration policy was an intellectual companion to our populist failure to control our banks. And no one can deny this unassailable truth: our unemployment figures have been made immeasurably worse by the large numbers of immigrants who poured unchecked into the Celtic Tiger economy. Finally, if you want to know what a combination of failed immigration and social policies can produce, why, just watch the TV news from London tonight.

– Kevin Myers

READ Article Here!


 

Rights of law-abiding citizens are ignored

 

Thursday August 11 2011

Kevin Myers (Irish Independent, August 10) has a point when he mentions the failure of immigration and absent fathers in Britain that, like, in this country, have never been seriously debated. It is a fact that racial assimilation in many parts of Britain’s inner cities has been a complete failure and the promotion of single parenthood should be seen for the disaster it has become.

Yet race and an absent father form parts of the story of the riots in Britain, at the bottom of whose society is a stratum of young adults with no discipline, skills, education, values or aspirations. These thugs are what they are because nobody makes them aspire to be anything different or better and one of the main reasons for such delinquency is a complete lack of any sanctions to deter it.

The people of Ireland shouldn’t comfort themselves with a misguided notion that such things couldn’t happen here. Visit any city on a weekend where you will witness anti-social behaviour.

I could point to many causes of social breakdown but in the main the legal system in the UK and increasingly here in Ireland consistently asserts the primacy of the rights of the criminal and aggressor over those of law-abiding citizens, especially where a young offender is involved.

Wedded to this is the welfare system that promotes idleness, subtracts personal responsibility and removes any incentive for self- improvement.

The promotion of proper civic behaviour and decency at all levels of society allied to zero tolerance and stern punishment of those who transgress may go some way to improving any society that has taken personal liberty to an absolute.

Derek Ross
Blessington, Co Wicklow

Irish Independent

 


Bravo for courageous analysis of UK violence

Thursday August 11 2011

I wish to congratulate Kevin Myers for his outstanding article on the role of absent “father figures” in the London riots. As a result of this brave analysis, he will probably be subjected to a tirade of abuse from the politically correct brigade who shamefully dominate our national discourse. The collapse of stable families, based on marriage, in any country inevitably leads to a vast increase in juvenile delinquency.

Both in this country and in the UK, we have effectively created a welfare system that encourages unemployment, absent fathers and a lifetime of dependency on the state. Unfortunately, those who have the courage to point out these facts are swiftly labelled as “judgmental” or, worse yet, “fascist”.

Of one thing we can be certain: given the policies we have pursued in this country, it is only a matter of time before our own major cities fall victim to the same thuggery and violence we have seen in Britain.

Bravo, Kevin Myers.

DR RUAIRI HANLEY
kells, Co meath

Shared Parenting Study from Oxford University is ‘Mischievous’ June 13,2011

“The Australian project of presumption of shared care has its issues and some of these are around the way in which presumption is interpreted by parents.  The picture painted in the Nuffield report however, states that presumption has lead to the upholding of father’s rights over children’s needs and mothers being unable to disclose violence and abuse.  This is disingenuous to say the least and to my mind, illuminates the agenda behind the research itself.  It is not the case that all fathers in Australia uphold their rights over their children’s needs.  Just as it is not the case that all mothers are pressurised into silence around issues of violence and abuse.  It may be true in some cases, it is not true in all and it is mischievous to assert that presumption has lead to this.”

See Youtube video here and Karen Woodall’s Blog here 

Both denounce the Nuffield Foundation report as “Mischevious”

Clare Daly asks an awkward question 21st July 2011

Clare Daly asked the Minister for Justice and Equality “If, in relation to Ireland’s national report in advance of the UN Universal Periodic Review (HERE), there is reference only to women’s rights and gender equality and that discrimination against men who are fathers is not considered, despite certain cases at the Equality Tribunal (details supplied), which indicated such discrimination”.

Read answer HERE  and make a comment. The discussion that evolves can then be sent to Minister Shatter.

Teacher loses sex bias case – 22nd July 2011

A TEACHER who claimed he suffered sex discrimination has lost his European battle to force the college to hand over the scoring sheets of candidates who got on to a social worker’s course, allowing for the continuation of the feminism of social Services.

Read full story HERE and HERE.

A Pro-Active Approach to Parenting in Family Law Cases- Roisin O Shea July 19th, 2011

“On the face of it there appears to be a bias against men, however, a qualitative analysis of my observations indicates that this percieved bias is in fact a result of societal norms and social factors around the traditional family unit in Ireland.”

“I continually see children’s rights being undermined by custodial parents, who frequently unilaterally cease access.”
“Why is it that in 99% of the cases before the Circuit court, women are the primary carers of the child or children, when in reality most fathers are 50:50 parents before the breakdown..”
“All players in family law cases seem to presume that young children are better off with the mother as the primary carer, that presumption leads to actions by the fathers that fundamentally changes the dynamic of parenting, and leads to an outcome in court that reflects the current circumstances of the parties”.
“How can fathers pro-actively approach parenting in family law cases?
1. If possible do not move out of the family home, when the marriage/relationship breaks down.”
See full paper here

Permission to remove children challenged-Irish Times 13th July 2011

AN IRISHWOMAN who had two children here by a Nigerian man has brought a High Court challenge aimed at overturning a District Court judge’s order allowing the man to bring the children permanently to Nigeria to live, against her wishes.

The relevant provisions of the Guardianship of Infants Act are unconstitutional if they allow the District Court to order the permanent removal of children to another jurisdiction without the continuing protection of the higher courts, she claims.
It is also claimed that, if the woman is not entitled to seek costs orders against district judges unless bad faith is established against them, that deprives her of an effective remedy, in breach of the European Convention on Human Rights Act 2003.
Read full article HERE.

Research claims that shared parenting legislation is not in the interests of children

Proposed UK legislation to introduce and enforce a presumption of shared parenting time for separating couples is not in the interests of children, according to a briefing paper published today by the Department of Social Policy and Intervention at the University of Oxford and funded by the Nuffield Foundation.

Read research HERE